Videos

Wild dog trapping in the woodlands of pastoral Queensland

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Lee Allen is a Senior Zoologist at the Robert Wicks Pest Animal Research Centre, Biosecurity Queensland. This series of videos describes and demonstrates methods and equipment used in wild dog trapping in and around the Toowoomba region.

Wild dogs and foxes pose a threat to livestock such as sheep, cattle, goats and poultry. In high density areas they may also be a health risk to humans and pets, through transmission of diseases such as distemper, parvo virus and mange.

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Wild dog trapping in the northern tablelands of NSW

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Tony Townsend is a professional wild dog trapper working in the open woodland forest country of the Northern Tablelands of New South Wales. This series of videos describes and demonstrates methods and equipment used in wild dog trapping in and around the Tenterfield region.

Wild dogs and foxes pose a threat to livestock such as sheep, cattle, goats and poultry. In high density areas they may also be a health risk to humans and pets, through transmission of diseases such as distemper, parvo virus and mange.

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Importance of rabbit biological control to livestock producers

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Rabbits have a significant impact on livestock production. Cameron Allan from Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) talks about how important the investment in rabbit biological controls has been for the livestock industry.
(Video production by DigitalFarmTV)

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Historical and current impacts of rabbits – a farmers perspective

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David Lord’s family has been in the wool producing game for generations at Thackaringa Station. He talks about the historical and current impacts of rabbits on farms, how important it is to act and how rabbit biological controls have played an important role.

(Video production by DigitalFarmTV)

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Community led integrated rabbit management

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Michael Reid, National Rabbit Facilitator, talks about the importance of community-led integrated rabbit management to protect productive landscapes.

(Video production by DigitalFarmTV)

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Genetic resistance, immunity and transmission of rabbit biocontrol

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Rabbits have a huge detrimental impact on the Australian natural and productive landscapes. Dr Tanja Strive talks about genetic resistance, immunity and transmission associated with rabbit biological control in Australia – namely rabbit haemorhagic disease virus (RHDV or calicivirus).

(Video production by DigitalFarmTV)

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Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) boost project

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Rabbits have a huge detrimental impact on the Australian natural and productive landscapes. Dr Tarnya Cox talks about the potential in Australia of a new strain of RHD (rabbit haemorrhagic disease) virus, otherwise known as calicivirus, to manage rabbit populations.

(Video production by DigitalFarmTV)

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Baiting with a baitlayer for rabbit control

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Lisa Thomas is a Senior Ranger with the NSW Livestock Health and Pest Authority (LHPA). In this video, Lisa discusses and demonstrates a baiting program for rabbit control. Aspects such as determining whether baiting will be effective, types of baits available (1080, pindone and RHDV) and steps involved are covered.

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Fumigation with phostoxin for rabbit control

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Lisa Thomas is a Senior Ranger with the NSW Livestock Health and Pest Authority (LHPA). In this video, Lisa discusses and demonstrates the process of fumigation with phostoxin for rabbit control. Aspects such as equipment needed and process are covered.

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Wild dogs in Australia – interviews with Peter Fleming

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Peter Fleming is one of Australia’s leading experts on wild dogs. In Australia wild dogs are becoming an ever-increasing problem for livestock producers and also impact on native wildlife populations. This series of short video interviews with Peter talks about the wild dog problem in Australia, trophic cascade and mesopredator release hypothesis and the importance of community engagement in wild dog management.

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Rabbit management and challenges – a farmer’s perspective

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Susan Campbell OAM is a long-time sheep producer and here talks about the rural and peri-urban challenges associated with the impact of rabbits in Australia.

(Video production by DigitalFarmTV)

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Choosing feral pig baiting sites

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Invasive Animals CRC Field Research Officer Jason Wishart discusses things to consider and what to look for when choosing a site to set up a bait station for feral pigs. This series of short videos demonstrates how considering water points, tracks, travel pads and other signs of feral pig activity can help you choose the best sites for feral pig bait stations.

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New and Emerging Pest Animals

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There are as many as 80 introduced animal species that have established wild populations throughout Australia. These invasive species impact our fragile environment, damage our rivers and wetlands, damage agricultural systems and threaten food security, impact on native flora and fauna, and cause many problems in urban areas. No established pest animal has ever been completely eradicated from the Australian mainland.

To reduce the risk of new exotic invasive pests becoming established in Australia, we need to focus on early detection of new species, and preventing known species from spreading into new areas.

This video takes a look at some of the unwanted invasive species that pose risks to Australia should they establish wild populations. Sightings of unusual animals in the wrong place should be reported to biosecurity authorities.

National Hotline: 1800 084 881

This project was funded under the Australian Pest Animal Research Program (APARP). 

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Principles of best practice pest animal management

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Each year pest animals cause over $720 million in damage to our economy, the environment and society.

This video describes the seven principles of best practice pest animal management that need to be considered when developing and implementing a pest control program.

This project was funded under the Australian Pest Animal Research Program (APARP).

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MouseAlert for monitoring mouse activity

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‘MouseAlert’ is a new interactive website allowing grain growers to record and view mouse activity in their local area in real time. It has been developed by the Invasive Animals CRC in partnership with GRDC, Landcare Research and CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems.
 
It provides farmers and landholders with a new way of keeping a close eye on changes in mouse populations. Data entered will help with early-warning of increases in mouse activity and better forecasts for plagues. Rapid response by growers can then minimise mouse damage.

In this video, Digital Farm TV interviews Dr. Peter Brown about how MouseAlert can help grain growers monitor mouse activity.

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Feral cats in Australia: Part 1 – History and Population

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Chris Dickman is a Professor in Terrestrial Ecology at the School of Biological Sciences, Sydney University. He has studied interactions between native and introduced species in the arid regions of Australia for many years. In this video, Chris discusses the history of cats in Australia, how they became a problem and spread into the bush, and their current population.

Feral cats live, hunt and reproduce in the wild. They have the body shape, acute senses and fine coordination perfectly suited for stalking and capturing prey. These traits have allowed feral cats to adapt to some of Australia’s harshest conditions and invade almost all parts of the continent. Cats probably arrived in Australia as pets of European settlers and were later deliberately introduced in an attempt to control rabbits and rodents. Cats now occupy 99% of Australia, including many offshore islands.

Feral cats need large amounts of fresh meat to survive and reproduce. In Australia they mainly eat small native and exotic mammals, birds, lizards and insects. About 80 endangered and threatened species are at risk from feral cat predation in Australia. feral cats also carry diseases which can affect humans and other animals.

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Feral cats in Australia

YouTube video playlist:

Feral cats live, hunt and reproduce in the wild. They have the body shape, acute senses and fine coordination perfectly suited for stalking and capturing prey. These traits have allowed feral cats to adapt to some of Australia’s harshest conditions and invade almost all parts of the continent. Cats probably arrived in Australia as pets of European settlers and were later deliberately introduced in an attempt to control rabbits and rodents. Cats now occupy 99% of Australia, including many offshore islands.

This series of videos gives a general introduction to the problem of feral cats in Australia and discusses their biology, impacts and control.

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Wild dog trapping in the Rangelands

Youtube video playlist:

Jim Miller is a wild dog trapper from the arid and semi arid rangelands of pastoral Western Australia. In this series of videos Jim explains and demonstrates some of the methods and equipment he uses in wild dog control in this region.

Wild dogs and foxes pose a threat to livestock such as sheep, cattle, goats and poultry. In high density areas they may also be a health risk to humans and pets, through transmission of diseases such as distemper, parvo virus and mange.

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Warren ripping for rabbit control

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Lisa Thomas is a Senior Ranger with the NSW Livestock Health and Pest Authority (LHPA). In this video, Lisa discusses and demonstrates warren ripping using a single tyne ripper for rabbit control.

Wild rabbits are Australia’s most widespread and destructive environmental and agricultural vertebrate pest. First arriving in Australia with the First Fleet, then deliberately released for hunting in the 1800?s, the rate of spread of the rabbit in Australia was the fastest of any colonising mammal anywhere in the world. They are now found in all states and territories, including several offshore islands. Rabbits graze on native and introduced vegetation, crops and pastures. Rabbit grazing can prevent seedlings from regenerating and reduce crop yields, as well as increase competition for feed with livestock. Rabbits damage native plants and directly compete with native wildlife for food and shelter. Their digging and browsing leads to a loss of vegetation cover, which in turn can result in slope instability and soil erosion. There are at least 156 threatened species that may be adversely affected by competition and land degradation by rabbits.

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PIGOUT® baits for feral pig control

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Steve Lapidge, former Program Leader with the Invasive Animals CRC, discusses and demonstrates the use of the PIGOUT® 1080 bait for feral pig control. Aspects such as bait station design and site selection, pre-feeding and toxic baiting are covered.

Pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today feral populations inhabit around 40% of Australia.Feral pigs cause agricultural damage through predation of newborn lambs, reduction in crop yields, damage to fences and water sources, and competition with stock for feed by consuming or damaging pasture. They also are considered a major threat to stock as a potential carrier of exotic diseases, with the major concern being their role as a reservoir for Foot-And-Mouth Disease should it ever become established in Australia or New Zealand.

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