Cost Effective Feral Animal Exclusion Fencing for Areas of High Conservation Value in Australia

Introduced feral animals in Australia pose a serious risk to native flora and fauna communities. The Department of the Environment and Heritage recognises in particular the impacts of European red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), feral cats (Felis catus), feral goats (Capra hircus), feral pigs (Sus scrofa) and feral rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as key threatening processes (Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (EPBC) 1999). Exclusion fencing is increasingly being used as a tool to protect areas of high conservation value from the threats posed by vertebrate pest species.

A myriad of fence designs exist for this purposes and there are currently few published guidelines available to advise conservation managers on the factors that need to be considered when assessing exclusion fence designs and when planning a fence’s alignment, construction and maintenance. Coman and McCutchan (1994) conducted a comprehensive review of fox and feral cat exclusion fencing in Australia. This current document expands on Coman and McCutchan’s report by  updating the available information on fox and cat exclusion fencing and including reviews of fences designed to exclude the other three mentioned species. Given the history of dingo (Canis familiaris) exclusion fencing in Australia (McKnight 1969), a review of these fences is also included.

Author Kirstin Long and Alan Robley
Year 2004
Publisher Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research
Department Department of Sustainability and Environment, VIC
Pages 61
ISBN/ISSN ISBN: 0642 549923
Control method Fencing
Region Australia - national
Documents

Cost Effective Feral Animal Exclusion Fencing for Areas of High Conservation Value in Australia [1.5 Mb PDF]

Links

https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/publications/animal-fencing.html