Assessing the effectiveness of buried baiting for the control of wild dogs in Victoria

Baits containing the poison 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate) are commonly used to reduce wild dog (Canis familiaris) (feral domestic dogs, dingoes and their hybrids) numbers in Australia. In 2009 we attempted to determine the optimal number of control devices (traps and bait stations) required to achieve a given reduction in wild dogs. Despite an extensive trapping effort by wild dog controllers over several weeks at four sites, only three dogs were captured. The project was refocused to provide more generalised information on the effectiveness of buried baiting as a tool for the control of wild dogs. This project aimed to quantify the effectiveness of buried baiting during autumn and early winter by assessing dog activity before and after a poisoning operation.

Documents

Assessing the effectiveness of buried baiting for the control of wild dogs in Victoria (800 kb PDF)

Links

https://www.dse.vic.gov.au/arthur-rylah-institute/publications/reports

Secondary title Technical Report Series No. 213
Author Alan Robley, Luke Woodford, Michael Lindeman, Greg Ivone, Mathew Beach, Ian Campbell, John Blair, Glenn Lineham and Wayne Peters
Year 2011
Place published Heidelberg
Publisher Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research
Department Department of Sustainability and Environment
Pages 21 pp
ISBN/ISSN ISBN 978-1-74343-945-8 (online)
Control method Baiting
Region VIC