Assessing the safe and effective use of aerial baiting for the control of wild dogs in Victoria

Wild dogs (Canis familiaris) — dingoes and feral or wild-living domestic dogs, and their hybrids — can reduce farm productivity and prey on native animal species, but they may also reduce the abundance of other introduced mammalian carnivores such as red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felix catus) (Glen and Dickman 2003; Robley et al. 2009). In Victoria, dingoes have recently been listed as a threatened species (Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1998), and loss of genetic integrity through hybridisation with wild dogs is listed as one of the main threatening process (Scientific Advisory Committee 2007). In Victoria, the state government invests approximately $4.4 million per annum in managing the impact of wild dogs on agricultural enterprises.

Aerial baiting for the control of wild dogs is used in Queensland, Western Australia, New South Wales and the Northern Territory, but its long-term cost-effectiveness has gone largely unassessed. In 2005, the Victorian Minister for the Environment and Water announced that trials would be undertaken on the safe and effective use of aerial baiting for the control of wild dogs in Victoria. Trials were undertaken between 2005 and 2007 in north-eastern Victoria and Gippsland.

These trials had three aims:

  1. To determine the accuracy of aerial bait delivery.
  2. To assess the effect of bait presentation on uptake by wild dogs, foxes, feral cats and non-target species.
  3. To assess the safe and effective use of aerial baiting in Victoria in relation to Spotted-tailed quolls (Dasyurus maculatus) and wild dogs
Documents

Assessing the safe and effective use of aerial baiting for the control of wild dogs in Victoria

Links

https://www.dse.vic.gov.au/arthur-rylah-institute/publications/reports

Secondary title Technical Report Series No. 217
Author Alan Robley
Year 2011
Place published Heidelberg
Publisher Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research
Department Department of Sustainability and Environment
Pages 45 pp
ISBN/ISSN ISBN 978-1-74287-008-3 (online)
Control method Baiting
Region VIC