A REVIEW OF 30 YEARS OF CANID ATTRACTANT RESEARCH

Predation by, disease spread from, and general management of introduced European red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and wild dogs (Canis familiaris) is a multi-million dollar problem in Australia. Queensland alone recently estimated that wild dogs cost that state’s economy $33M annually. Effective local management tools for foxes and wild dogs are therefore essential for land managers to ensure they can minimise the impact of these species on stock or native wildlife. One such tool that has not been widely adopted in Australia is that of attractants or lures.

Olfaction is a primary source of communication for canids. They use it to relate information on reproductive condition, social status of individuals, and group and individual territories. Urine, faeces, vaginal and anal gland excretions, and sebcaudial (circumanal, subcaudal and subauricular) gland excretions are all potential sources of odour and information in Canidae, and all have been used as natural canid attractants by canid trappers for decades.

Author Steven Lapidge
Year 2005
Place published Canberra
Publisher Pestat Ltd
Institution Pestat Ltd
Pages 18
Documents

Lure review