Wild dog

NWDAP-fulllogoWild dogs prey on a variety of animals including mammals, birds and reptiles of all sizes from insects to water buffalo. However, they prefer to eat small and medium-sized mammals when available, including native mice, dunnarts, bandicoots and wallabies. Wild dogs have been implicated in the decline of several species, both historically and in the recent past.

Dingoes originated in Asia where they were present possibly 10 000 to 14 000 years ago and were derived from wolves.  Aboriginal people brought the dingo to Australia approximately 4000 years ago. The dingo never reached Tasmania. Domestic dogs were brought into Australia by Europeans in 1788 and their release into the wild has continued since. Both dingoes and wild domestic dogs are the same species, Canis familiaris.

 


Learn More arrow-right

 

 


Act

STEP 1

Define the problem and assess the impacts

STEP 2

Set measurable objectives

STEP 3

Plan your response

STEP 4

Control and monitor

Wild dog management strategies are most successful when people work together. Because wild dogs do not respect tenure boundaries such as fences, borders or land uses, wild dog managers in one area are likely to be affected by the actions or inaction of people in surrounding areas. Working together ensures that everyone has input into a management approach. This typically requires a little bit of work from a lot of people, rather than a lot of work from a few people.

A strategic approach to managing wild dogs broadly involves: defining the issue, developing a plan of action with achievable and measurable goals, putting the plan into action, monitoring progress, evaluating the plan, and making adjustments and improvements before trying it again.

Standard Operating Procedures – wild dog control

  • Model code of practice for the humane control of wild dogs - The aim of this code of practice is to provide information and recommendations to vertebrate pest managers responsible for the control of wild dogs. It includes advice on how to […]
  • DOG001: Trapping of wild dogs using padded-jaw traps - Trapping of wild dogs is often used where poison baiting is less effective, for example, in or around lambing paddocks where there is abundant food. Trapping is useful for targeting […]
  • DOG002: Trapping of wild dogs using cage traps - Trapping of wild dogs is used where poison baiting is less effective, for example, in or around lambing paddocks where there is abundant food. Trapping is useful for targeting individual […]
  • DOG004: Ground baiting of wild dogs with 1080 - Wild dogs, which include feral domestic dogs, dingoes and their hybrids, prey on livestock causing significant impact on agricultural production. Methods of control include poisoning with sodium fluoroacetate (commonly known […]
  • DOG003: Ground Shooting of Wild Dogs - Shooting of wild dogs is undertaken by government vertebrate pest control officers, landholders and professional or experienced amateur shooters. Shooting is usually an opportunistic method of control although it can […]
  • DOG005: Aerial baiting of wild dogs with 1080 - Wild dogs, which include feral domestic dogs, dingoes and their hybrids, prey on livestock causing significant impact on agricultural production. Methods of control include poisoning with sodium monofluoroacetate (1080), trapping, […]
  • GEN001: Methods of euthanasia - The word euthanasia means an easy death and should be regarded as an act of humane killing with the minimum of pain, fear and distress. Euthanasia of a range of […]
  • GEN002: The care & management of dogs used in the control of pest animals - Dogs are used for a range of pest animal control operations. This procedure provides advice on first aid and basic care for dogs used in these situations. It is written […]

 

 


Connect

Greg Mifsud is the The National Wild Dog Facilitator.

Greg’s role is to guide and mentor State, NRM and Industry-funded wild dog Coordinators in supporting and developing functional local wild dog management groups.

Greg is based in Toowoomba, Qld and can be contacted at:
Invasive Animals CRC
203 Tor St | PO Box 102 | Toowoomba, Qld 4352
Phone:   +61 7 4688 1333    Email: greg.mifsud@invasiveanimals.com

 


Videos

Case studies

Last updated: September 20, 2016