Dog_LeeAllen

Wild dog

NWDAP-fulllogoDingoes (Canis lupus dingo) originated in Asia where they were present possibly 10 000 to 14 000 years ago and were derived from wolves.  Aboriginal people brought the dingo to Australia approximately 4000 years ago. The dingo never reached Tasmania. Domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) were brought into Australia by Europeans in 1788 and their release into the wild has continued since.

Wild dogs prey on a variety of animals including mammals, birds and reptiles of all sizes from insects to water buffalo. However, they prefer to eat small and medium-sized mammals when available, including native mice, dunnarts, bandicoots and wallabies. Wild dogs have been implicated in the decline of several species, both historically and in the recent past.


Learn More arrow-right

  • Darren Marshall Wild Dogs Wild Dog Alert - Automated recognition and messaging system for wild dog management
  • dog_fenceWA2 FAQ: Wild dog home ranges and movements - Information on where wild dogs live, where and how they move
  • Print National Wild Dog Action Plan - The National Wild Dog Action Plan is an industry initiative endorsed by Government.
  • red-fox2cropped IA CRC product status update - August 2015 update on status of IA CRC products in development
  • My beautiful picture FAQ: Wild dog biology, behaviour & ecology - What’s the difference between a Dingo and a wild dog? What time of year do wild dogs mate? What do they eat?
  • Graham-WIENERT_wild-dogs FAQ: Wild dog impacts - Frequently asked questions about the impacts of wild dogs
  • dogs_PWest Distribution of pure dingoes and dingo-dog hybrids in Australia - The term ‘wild dog’ collectively refers to pure dingoes, feral domestic dogs and hybrids between the two. In other words, all free-roaming Canis species are labelled and managed as wild dogs. Grey wolves (Canis lupus) were domesticated by people in Asia over  10,000 years ago to create dingoes. A few of these domesticated  animals were […]
  • Pest - Wild Dog Wild dog policy and legislation considerations - Legal status and management: Wild dogs are identified by the national Vertebrate Pests Committee as a ‘Category 5 / Extreme’ species. Category 5 means that the animal is a recognised pest that is both widespread and established, while an Extreme classification indicates that such animals should not be allowed to enter, nor be kept in […]
  • humaneness Wild dog – humaneness matrix - Matrix showing the relative humaneness of wild dog control methods. The ‘humaneness’ of a pest animal control method refers to the overall welfare impact that the method has on an  individual animal. A relatively more humane method will have less impact than a relatively less humane method. (Sharp and Saunders, 2008) has been developed under […]
  • NShumway_Dingo_eating_Turtle Wild dog risks to threatened wildlife - Wild dogs prey on a variety of animals including mammals, birds and reptiles of all sizes from insects to water buffalo. However, they prefer to eat small and medium-sized mammals when available, including native mice, dunnarts, bandicoots and wallabies. Wild dogs can present significant risks to populations of many of  these species, and the continual […]

 

 


Act

STEP 1

Define the problem and assess the impacts

STEP 2

Set measurable objectives

STEP 3

Plan your response

STEP 4

Control and monitor

  • Footprints01 Have you got wild dogs? - Detecting the presence of wild dogs and their impacts: It is common for wild dogs to be present in an area but go unnoticed or unrecognised. No matter what colour a free-roaming dog is, if it is not your dog it should be considered a wild dog. There are several indicators that suggest that wild […]
  • GBGcover Glovebox Guide for Managing Wild Dogs - This Glovebox Guide for Managing Wild Dogs is a general guide to managing populations of wild dogs in Australia. This guide uses the term ‘wild dogs’ to describe any wild-living members of the genus Canis, including pure dingoes, feral domestic dogs and crossbreds between the two. Wild dogs present significant economic, environmental and social impacts […]
  • DogBrnBok_cover Guidelines for Preparing a Working Plan to Manage Wild Dogs (brown book) - These guidelines may be used to help stakeholders complete a working plan to manage wild dogs for any purpose.
  • DogGrnBk_cover Working Plan to Manage Wild Dogs (green book) - This document outlines a six-step strategic approach to the management of dingoes and other wild dogs
  • WorkingDog_DWorsley Working dog safety & first aid - Provides information on safety and first aid for working dogs in case of poisoning by 1080 or PAPP, or leg injury due to traps.
  • report Participatory wild dog management: views and practices of Australian wild dog management groups - Attacks by wild dogs (including dingoes, feral domestic dogs and hybrids) on livestock have an adverse effect on Australia’s agricultural production and agricultural communities. The objective of this project, undertaken for Australian Wool Innovation (AWI), is to examine the features of wild dog management groups, particularly in terms of landholder participation and collaboration, to identify […]
  • Comm2_dog Facilitating the strategic management of wild dogs throughout Australia - The National Wild Dog Facilitator project was developed to meet the growing need for co-ordinated and strategic management of wild dogs across Australia
  • TrappingDVD Trapping Introduced Predators for the Protection of Biodiversity and Livestock: an instructional DVD - Development of this instructional DVD for trapping introduced predators (wild dog, red fox and feral cat)
  • Rabbits_web Vertebrate Pesticides: An Australian Guide - This project has produced a publication containing relevant information on all the currently registered vertebrate pesticides in Australia
  • AerialBaitingRept An investigation of aerial baiting rates for strategic control of wild dogs - Outcomes of a series of trials to determine the efficacy of aerial baiting for wild dogs at two bait distribution rates, 10 baits per kilometre of flown transect and 40 baits per km.
  • JFrappell_Wild_Dog_Bait FAQ: Wild dogs and poison baiting - Frequently asked questions about poison baiting for wild dog control
  • Paroo_cover Paroo Model of Wild Dog Control - The Paroo Shire residents have been leaders in developing and implementing best practice in the coordinated control of wild dogs. Wild Dogs are defined as feral dogs, dingoes and hybrid canines and are a declared pest under the Land  Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002. The Paroo Shire Council made a decision in […]
  • Trapped dog4 Tools and strategies for wild dog management - Tools to control wild dogs There are several different lethal and non-lethal tools available to control wild dogs. These include poison baits, traps, shooting,  fencing, guard animals and aversion techniques (such as lights,  alarms, and flagging). Not all tools are useful for a given area; each  tool varies in its effectiveness, depending on a range […]
  • GuardDog_cover Guardian Dogs: Best Practice Manual for the use of Livestock Guardian Dogs. - Livestock guardian dogs are medium to large sized dogs that are kept with livestock to protect them from predators. In Australia they are mainly used to protect sheep, goats and poultry, but they can work with any type of livestock; for example, with cattle, horses, rabbits, deer, emu or ostriches. These dogs live permanently with […]
  • wild-dog-placeholder Monitoring techniques for vertebrate pests – Wild dogs - The purpose of this manual is to provide details of the techniques available to monitor the wild dog in Australia. By providing a step-by-step description of each technique it will be possible to standardise many monitoring programs and make valid comparisons of abundance and damage across the nation. This is becoming increasingly important for the […]
  • 1stAid1080_cover First aid – 1080 and your dog - This pamphlet has been designed as a guideline to provide basic first aid information for suspected 1080 poisoning of pet and working dogs.
  • wild-dog-placeholder Managing the Impacts of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs - Managing the Impacts of Dingoes and Other Wild Dogs is the first book to provide a comprehensive review of the history and biology of wild dogs in Australia, the damage they cause and community attitudes towards their management. Australia’s wild dogs include dingoes, introduced around 4000 years ago, feral domestic dogs and hybrids between the […]

Wild dog management strategies are most successful when people work together. Because wild dogs do not respect tenure boundaries such as fences, borders or land uses, wild dog managers in one area are likely to be affected by the actions or inaction of people in surrounding areas. Working together ensures that all stakeholders have input into a management approach that covers the views of each interest group. This typically requires a little bit of work from a lot of people, rather than a lot of work from a few people.

A strategic approach to managing wild dogs broadly involves: defining the issue, developing a plan of action with achievable and measurable goals, putting the plan into action, monitoring progress, evaluating the plan, and making adjustments and improvements before trying it again.

Standard Operating Procedures – wild dog control

  • PestSmart_logo GEN001: Methods of euthanasia - The word euthanasia means an easy death and should be regarded as an act of humane killing with the minimum of pain, fear and distress. Euthanasia of a range of animal species is often necessary during pest animal control programs and occasionally in research involving the capture or restraint of pest animals. Therefore, all researchers […]
  • AlfManciagli_farmdog GEN002: The care & management of dogs used in the control of pest animals - Dogs are used for a range of pest animal control operations. This procedure provides advice on first aid and basic care for dogs used in these situations. It is written to prevent harm to dogs, and encourage their humane treatment. This standard operating procedure (SOP) is a guide only; it does not replace or override […]
  • wild-dog-placeholder DOG003: Ground Shooting of Wild Dogs - Shooting of wild dogs is undertaken by government vertebrate pest control officers, landholders and professional or experienced amateur shooters. Shooting is usually an opportunistic method of control although it can be used to target specific problem animals. It is labour intensive and considered an ineffective technique to reduce populations of wild dogs over extensive areas. […]
  • wild-dog-placeholder DOG004: Ground baiting of wild dogs with 1080 - Wild dogs, which include feral domestic dogs, dingoes and their hybrids, prey on livestock causing significant impact on agricultural production. Methods of control include poisoning with sodium fluoroacetate (commonly known as 1080), trapping, shooting, exclusion fencing, aversion and use of livestock guarding animals. Lethal baiting is considered to be the most cost-effective control method currently […]
  • wild-dog-placeholder DOG005: Aerial baiting of wild dogs with 1080 - Wild dogs, which include feral domestic dogs, dingoes and their hybrids, prey on livestock causing significant impact on agricultural production. Methods of control include poisoning with sodium monofluoroacetate (1080), trapping, shooting, exclusion fencing, aversion and use of livestock guarding animals. Lethal baiting is considered to be the most cost-effective control currently available and is the […]
  • wild-dog-placeholder DOG001: Trapping of wild dogs using padded-jaw traps - Trapping of wild dogs is often used where poison baiting is less effective, for example, in or around lambing paddocks where there is abundant food. Trapping is useful for targeting individual problem animals, or as a follow-up after 1080 baiting programs, but is regarded as an inefficient method for general population control. Padded leg-hold traps […]
  • wild-dog-placeholder DOG002: Trapping of wild dogs using cage traps - Trapping of wild dogs is used where poison baiting is less effective, for example, in or around lambing paddocks where there is abundant food. Trapping is useful for targeting individual problem animals or as a follow-up after 1080 baiting programs, but is regarded as an inefficient method for general population control. Cage traps are used […]
  • wild-dog-placeholder Model code of practice for the humane control of wild dogs - The aim of this code of practice is to provide information and recommendations to vertebrate pest managers responsible for the control of wild dogs. It includes advice on how to choose the most humane, target specific, cost effective and efficacious technique for reducing the negative impact of wild dogs. This code of practice (COP) is […]

 

 


Connect

Greg Mifsud is the The National Wild Dog Facilitator.

Greg’s role is to guide and mentor State, NRM and Industry-funded wild dog Coordinators in supporting and developing functional local wild dog management groups.

Greg is based in Toowoomba, Qld and can be contacted at:
Invasive Animals CRC
203 Tor St | PO Box 102 | Toowoomba, Qld 4352
Phone:   +61 7 4688 1333    Email: greg.mifsud@invasiveanimals.com

 


Videos

Case studies

  • wild dog Wild dogs and transmission of Neospora caninum in Australia - Case study that investigates the potential of wild dogs as a cause of abortion outbreaks in Australian dairy and beef cattle herds
  • Paroo_cover Paroo Model of Wild Dog Control - The Paroo Shire residents have been leaders in developing and implementing best practice in the coordinated control of wild dogs. Wild Dogs are defined as feral dogs, dingoes and hybrid canines and are a declared pest under the Land  Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002. The Paroo Shire Council made a decision in […]
Last updated: December 22, 2015