New and emerging

A ‘new and emerging’ vertebrate pest problem may be caused by the establishment of pest populations of species previously not found in Australia, or the expansion of a already established species into a new area or region. The relatively recent introduction of foxes to Tasmania is an example of this.Prevention of invasive animal problems is the most cost-effective course of action. In the failure of prevention, early detection is vitally important in controlling new incursions.

To help prevent new invasive animal problems, governments need to put systems in place to ensure that ‘high risk’ species – those that could readily establish and become pests in the wild – are not imported into Australia. Click on the “Risk Assessments” link to the right to find information and guidelines on current risk assessment systems.

  • Policies, legislation, agencies and programs
    This page contains links to many relevant policies, strategies and guidelines at state, national and international levels.
  • Prevention
    Use this page to link to risk assessment and distribution models and case studies, eg Savannah cat import ban.
  • Detection & Eradication
    Links to predictive and interactive mapping resources, information on detection techniques and case studies from both Australian and overseas.
  • Risk assessment
    Contains information and links on risk assessment policies and models, and pest animal alerts

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MichelleChristy_headshotMichelle Christy is the National Incursions Response Facilitator. Michelle’s role is to support actions and provide advice for invasive vertebrate pest incursion prevention and response planning.

Michelle is based in Perth, WA and can be contacted at:
Invasive Species Science, Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia
3 Baron-Hay Crt | South Perth WA 6151
Phone: +61 (0) 8 9363 4060 Email: Michelle.Christy@agric.wa.gov.au

 

 

Last updated: January 4, 2017