Feral pig

Feral pigs cause agricultural damage through preying on newborn lambs, reducing crop yields, damaging fences and water sources, and competing with stock for feed by consuming or damaging pasture.

They also are considered a major threat to stock as a potential carrier of exotic diseases, with the biggest concern being their role as a reservoir for Foot-And-Mouth Disease should it ever become established in Australia or New Zealand.

Feral pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today inhabit around 40% of Australia.

 

 


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  • Feral pig – humaneness matrix - Matrix showing the relative humaneness of feral pig control methods. The ‘humaneness’ of a pest animal control method refers to the overall welfare impact that the method has on an  individual animal. A relatively more humane method will have less impact than a relatively less humane method. (Sharp and Saunders, 2008) has been developed under […]
  • pig-placeholder PestSmart Factsheet: Feral pig - Feral pigs in Australia descend from domestic swine, but look more similar to Eurasia’s wild boar than their domestic counterparts. They tend to have sparse, coarse hair on lean and muscular frames, well-developed necks and shoulders that taper to short hindquarters. Colouration is predominantly black, rust-coloured or black and white spotted. Females are usually smaller […]
  • pig-placeholder Managing Vertebrate Pests: Feral Pigs - Australia’s feral pigs were introduced from Europe and Asia and are now widespread across much of eastern and northern Australia. Feral pigs are a complex management problem, for they are both an agricultural and environmental pest and a commercial resource, providing income to those who harvest them for sale. Feral pigs prey on lambs, eat […]

 


Act

STEP 1

Define the problem and assess the impacts

STEP 2

Set measurable objectives

STEP 3

Plan your response

STEP 4

Control and monitor

  • BaitStationSites Choosing feral pig baiting sites - Video on things to consider and what to look for when choosing a site to set up a bait station for feral pigs
  • Pigs_websplash Glovebox Guide for Managing Feral Pigs - Practical resource designed to assist Australian land managers in feral pig control
  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Feral Pigs: a field guide to poison baiting - Field guide booklet focusing on poison baiting for feral pig control
  • Rabbits_web Vertebrate Pesticides: An Australian Guide - This project has produced a publication containing relevant information on all the currently registered vertebrate pesticides in Australia
  • MalLeeson_Aerial_pig Aerial and ground shooting for feral pig control - Aerial shooting Aerial shooting from helicopters is useful for rapid population reduction in large, inaccessible areas. Where pig densities are high, aerial shooting can kill many pigs at a time, quickly knocking down pig numbers in the short term. Aerial shooting is also useful when pigs show avoidance behaviour to baits, traps, vehicles and/or people […]
  • Jim-Mitchell_pig_silo-trap Trapping for feral pig control in Australia - Introduction Trapping is one of the most common techniques used to control feral pigs in Australia. In the Wet Tropics of Queensland, where non-target native species are abundant, trapping is regarded as the safest and most appropriate method. However, it can be labour intensive and is not practical for a large scale control in grazing […]
  • OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Poison baiting for feral pig control in Australia - Introduction Poison baiting is one of the most economical and effective ways to control feral pigs on a broad scale. Aerial baiting can be more practical in hard to access and large, remote areas, especially when there is an urgent need to control diseases that feral pigs might carry. However, aerial baiting is illegal in […]
  • pigoutVid PIGOUT® baits for feral pig control - YouTube video: Steve Lapidge, former Program Leader with the Invasive Animals CRC, discusses and demonstrates the use of the PIGOUT® 1080 bait for feral pig control. Aspects such as bait station design and site selection, pre-feeding and toxic baiting are covered. Pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today feral populations inhabit around […]
  • hoggoneVid Use of the HogHopper® for baiting of feral pigs - YouTube video: Jason Wishart is a Project Officer with the Invasive Animals CRC. In this video, Jason discusses and demonstrates the use of the HogHopper® bait delivery device for feral pig control. Aspects such as assembly, site selection, pre-feeding and toxic baiting are covered. Pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today feral […]
  • Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 10.16.18 pm Trapping for feral pig control - YouTube video: Jason Neville is a Pest Management Officer with the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service. In this video, Jason and Paul Meek (project officer with the Invasive Animals CRC) discuss and demonstrate the use of both a silo mesh or heat-shaped trap and the panel trap for catching feral pigs. Pigs arrived in […]
  • Pig_at_trap_KI Practical feral pig control - Feral pigs adversely impact large sections of Australian agriculture and the natural environment, costing the economy over $100 million annually. Most states and territories have clear legislative requirements to ensure that feral pigs are controlled appropriately1. The responsibility to reduce feral pig densities on their property rests with the land owner/manager, whether it be park […]
  • pigs_baits Frequently asked questions about HOG­­­­­­­GONE® - The Factsheet below covers frequently asked questions about HOGGONE® feral pig baits in Australia. Some of the questions covered include: What is HOG­­­­­­­GONE® and how does it work? Is sodium nitrite really more humane than existing feral pig baits? Isn’t nitrite a strictly controlled substance? Can I use standard meat preserving nitrite for feral pig […]
  • pig-placeholder Monitoring techniques for vertebrate pests – Feral pigs - The purpose of this manual is to provide details of the techniques available to monitor vertebrate pests in Australia. By providing a step-by-step description of each technique it will be possible to standardise many monitoring programs and make valid comparisons of abundance and damage across the nation. This is becoming increasingly important for the states, […]
  • 1stAid1080_cover First aid – 1080 and your dog - This pamphlet has been designed as a guideline to provide basic first aid information for suspected 1080 poisoning of pet and working dogs.

Feral Pig control – Standard Operating Procedures

  • pig-placeholder PIG001: Trapping of feral pigs - Feral pigs (Sus scrofa) have a significant impact on the environment and agricultural production and are a potential reservoir and vector of exotic diseases. Control methods include poisoning, trapping, exclusion fencing, ground shooting and shooting from helicopters. Commercial harvesters also use traps to capture pigs for export as wild boar meat. Prior to trapping, free […]
  • pig-placeholder PIG003: Ground shooting of feral pigs - Feral pigs (Sus scrofa) have a significant impact on the environment and agricultural production and are a potential reservoir and vector of exotic diseases. Control methods include poisoning, trapping, exclusion fencing, ground shooting and shooting from helicopters. Ground shooting of feral pigs is undertaken by government vertebrate pest control officers, landholders and professional or experienced […]
  • pig-placeholder PIG005: Poisoning of feral pigs with 1080 - Feral pigs (Sus scrofa) have a significant impact on the environment and agricultural production and are a potential reservoir and vector of exotic diseases. Control methods include poisoning, trapping exclusion, fencing, ground shooting and shooting from helicopters. Poisoning with sodium monoflouroacetate (1080) is considered to be one of the most effective methods of quickly reducing […]
  • pig-placeholder PIG004: Use of Judas pigs - Feral pigs (Sus scrofa) have a significant impact on the environment and agricultural production and are a potential reservoir and vector of exotic diseases. Control methods include poisoning, trapping, exclusion fencing, ground shooting and shooting from helicopters. Radio-collared ‘Judas’ pigs are used to locate groups of feral pigs that are difficult to find by other […]
  • pig-placeholder PIG002: Aerial shooting of feral pigs - Feral pigs (Sus scrofa) have a significant impact on the environment and agricultural production and are a potential reservoir and vector of exotic diseases. Control methods include poisoning, trapping, exclusion fencing, ground shooting and shooting from helicopters. Aerial shooting of feral pigs from a helicopter is used in extensive or otherwise inaccessible areas where the […]
  • PestSmart_logo GEN001: Methods of euthanasia - The word euthanasia means an easy death and should be regarded as an act of humane killing with the minimum of pain, fear and distress. Euthanasia of a range of animal species is often necessary during pest animal control programs and occasionally in research involving the capture or restraint of pest animals. Therefore, all researchers […]
  • pig-placeholder Model code of practice for the humane control of feral pigs - The aim of this code of practice is to provide information and recommendations to vertebrate pest managers responsible for the control of feral pigs. It includes advice on how to choose the most humane, target specific, cost effective and efficacious technique for reducing the negative impact of feral pigs. This code of practice (COP) is […]

 

 


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Case studies

Videos

  • BaitStationSites Choosing feral pig baiting sites - Video on things to consider and what to look for when choosing a site to set up a bait station for feral pigs
  • pigoutVid PIGOUT® baits for feral pig control - YouTube video: Steve Lapidge, former Program Leader with the Invasive Animals CRC, discusses and demonstrates the use of the PIGOUT® 1080 bait for feral pig control. Aspects such as bait station design and site selection, pre-feeding and toxic baiting are covered. Pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today feral populations inhabit around […]
  • hoggoneVid Use of the HogHopper® for baiting of feral pigs - YouTube video: Jason Wishart is a Project Officer with the Invasive Animals CRC. In this video, Jason discusses and demonstrates the use of the HogHopper® bait delivery device for feral pig control. Aspects such as assembly, site selection, pre-feeding and toxic baiting are covered. Pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today feral […]
  • hoggoneVid New tools for feral pig control: HOG-GONE® and sodium nitrite - YouTube video: Steve Lapidge is a former Program Leader with the Invasive Animals CRC. In this video, Steve discusses the development of the HOG-GONE® bait and sodium nitirite concentrate as a new toxin for feral pig control. Pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today feral populations inhabit around 40% of Australia.Feral pigs […]
  • Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 10.16.18 pm Trapping for feral pig control - YouTube video: Jason Neville is a Pest Management Officer with the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service. In this video, Jason and Paul Meek (project officer with the Invasive Animals CRC) discuss and demonstrate the use of both a silo mesh or heat-shaped trap and the panel trap for catching feral pigs. Pigs arrived in […]
  • Feral_pigs_Vid Feral pigs in Australia - YouTube video playlist: Pigs arrived in Australia with the First Fleet and today feral populations inhabit around 40% of Australia. Feral pigs cause agricultural damage through predation of newborn lambs, reduction in crop yields, damage to fences and water sources, and competition with stock for feed by consuming or damaging pasture. They also are considered […]
Last updated: June 22, 2016